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Antelope, CA 95843 Weather
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Current Conditions [Select Refresh to Update]

Updated: 8:33pm on 1/18/17

(location)

Currently:
47.9°

Clear
light rain

High: 49.8° 
(6:42pm) 
Low: 42.4° 
(12:01am)
Wind: 20 mph from the SSE
Gust: 20 mph
Today's High Wind: 40 mph (7:21pm)
Humidity: 91%
Pressure: 29.77 in  (Rising) 
Pressure Rate: 0.024 in/hr
Dew Point: 45.4°
Wind Chill: 40.8°
Heat Index (feels like): 53.7°
Comfort Level: Cool
Temperature Rate:  -0.41°/hr
 
5 Day Forecast
 
Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon
Clear Clear Clear Clear Clear
Rain Rain Chance T-storms Rain Rain
54° 52° 53° 53° 51°
44° 43° 45° 40° 36°

Records and Normals
 
Temperature Forecast Normal Record
High 54° 57° 76°
(1920)
Low 44° 37° 17°
(1917)
 
Weather Advisories
Warning Description: Wind Advisory
Full Advisory Text...
Weather Map

Almanac
 
Sunrise:  
7:19am
Moonrise: 
11:58pm

Moon Phase:
62%

Sunset: 
5:10pm
Moonset:  
11:07am
 Star Chart...
Rainfall Totals
Hourly Rain 0.00 in
Daily Rain: 0.03 in
Monthly Rain: 2.51 in
Yearly Rain: 9.90 in
Normal Rain, month to date: 8.69 in
Normal Rain, year to date: 8.69 in
Local Weather Exchange Network
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 (°)

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Point (°)
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(%)
Wind 
(mph)
from the Wind Gust 
(mph) 
Pressure (in) Hourly
Rain (in)

Full Advisory Text
Warning Description: Wind Advisory

Warning Date: 8:13 PM PST on January 18, 2017

WarningSum:...Wind Advisory Remains In Effect Until Midnight Pst Tonight...

Warning Message:...High Wind Warning has expired...
* timing...strong southeast winds until midnight.
* Winds...sustained southeast winds between 20 and 40 mph with
  gusts 35 to 50 mph will continue this evening. 
* Impacts...additional downed trees or tree limbs and power 
outages.
Precautionary/preparedness actions...
A Wind Advisory means that winds of 40 mph or more are expected.
Winds this strong can make driving difficult, especially for high
profile vehicles. Use extra caution.
Precautionary/preparedness actions...
A Wind Advisory means that winds of 35 mph are expected. Winds
this strong can make driving difficult, especially for high
profile vehicles. Use extra caution.
Interact with US via social media
www.Facebook.Com/NWS.Sacramento
www.Twitter.Com/nwssacramento
WarningDesc:Hydrologic Statement, Special Statement

WarningDate:2:04 PM PST on January 18, 2017

WarningSum:...Gale Warning Now In Effect Until 11 Pm Pst This Evening...

Warning Message:Forecast information for
  Sacramento River at Tisdale Weir.
* At  1:15 PM Wednesday the stage was 48.5 feet.
* Present overflow depth is about 3.0 ft then overflow depth at Weir 
  decreasing to 2.8 ft near tomorrow noon then overflow depth at Weir
  increasing to 3.4 ft near Friday noon then overflow to remain near 
  depth of 3.4 ft thru Friday afternoon.
* Flood stage 53.0 ft
* monitor stage 45.5 ft
* impact...near 45.5 feet, Tisdale Weir crest elevation. Overflow 
  begins into the Tisdale bypass. This water eventually ends up in 
  the Sutter bypass.
 &&
Lat...Lon 3916 12193 3906 12173 3891 12162 3893 12193
Chandler
508 am PST Wed Jan 18 2017
...Stormy weather returning to northern California over the next 
several days...
A series of Pacific frontal systems will bring an end to the
period of dry weather northern California has experienced over the
last several days. The first storm in the series begun moving 
into norcal Wednesday morning bringing light precipitation over 
parts of the north state. Heavier rain and mountain snow will be 
pushing over the north state between Wednesday afternoon and 
Thursday.
This first moderately strong weather system will bring between
three quarters and two inches of rainfall to the valley from mid 
day Wednesday to mid day Thursday. Some foothill locations could 
see 3 inches or more of rainfall. Snow levels will start out 
moderately high at between 5000 and 6000 feet but then lower to 
around 4000 feet by Thursday afternoon. Several inches of snow 
will be possible above 4000 feet with up to a foot and a half possible
higher elevation and two feet or more possible highest peaks. 
In addition to the rain and snow...gusty winds are likely with the
Wednesday/Thursday system. Winds gusts to 40 mph are forecast for
the valley and up to 50 mph over the mountains. White-out 
conditions will be possible at times over the Sierra Cascade 
Range. 
After a break on Thursday afternoon and evening another storm
system will hit northern California on Friday. This system will be
a little weaker than the previous system in precipitation amounts
and wind but will come with lower snow levels generally between 
3000 and 4000 feet. Another Pacific storm is forecast to move 
through around Sunday bringing still more rain, wind and mountain 
snow but with even lower snow levels between 2000 and 3000 feet. 
Travel impacts over the mountains are likely with each of these 
weather systems with chain controls and delays likely. Local 
flooding potential will return as well especially as rainfall 
accumulation totals rise with each storm. Finally...periods of
strong winds may bring downed trees or tree limbs and cause power
outages especially late Wednesday and Sunday. 
Those that may be impacted by this series of storms should 
continue to monitor the latest forecasts. 
508 am PST Wed Jan 18 2017
...Stormy weather returning to northern California over the next 
several days...
A series of Pacific frontal systems will bring an end to the
period of dry weather northern California has experienced over the
last several days. The first storm in the series begun moving 
into norcal Wednesday morning bringing light precipitation over 
parts of the north state. Heavier rain and mountain snow will be 
pushing over the north state between Wednesday afternoon and 
Thursday.
This first moderately strong weather system will bring between
three quarters and two inches of rainfall to the valley from mid 
day Wednesday to mid day Thursday. Some foothill locations could 
see 3 inches or more of rainfall. Snow levels will start out 
moderately high at between 5000 and 6000 feet but then lower to 
around 4000 feet by Thursday afternoon. Several inches of snow 
will be possible above 4000 feet with up to a foot and a half possible
higher elevation and two feet or more possible highest peaks. 
In addition to the rain and snow...gusty winds are likely with the
Wednesday/Thursday system. Winds gusts to 40 mph are forecast for
the valley and up to 50 mph over the mountains. White-out 
conditions will be possible at times over the Sierra Cascade 
Range. 
After a break on Thursday afternoon and evening another storm
system will hit northern California on Friday. This system will be
a little weaker than the previous system in precipitation amounts
and wind but will come with lower snow levels generally between 
3000 and 4000 feet. Another Pacific storm is forecast to move 
through around Sunday bringing still more rain, wind and mountain 
snow but with even lower snow levels between 2000 and 3000 feet. 
Travel impacts over the mountains are likely with each of these 
weather systems with chain controls and delays likely. Local 
flooding potential will return as well especially as rainfall 
accumulation totals rise with each storm. Finally...periods of
strong winds may bring downed trees or tree limbs and cause power
outages especially late Wednesday and Sunday. 
Those that may be impacted by this series of storms should 
continue to monitor the latest forecasts. 
508 am PST Wed Jan 18 2017
...Stormy weather returning to northern California over the next 
several days...
A series of Pacific frontal systems will bring an end to the
period of dry weather northern California has experienced over the
last several days. The first storm in the series begun moving 
into norcal Wednesday morning bringing light precipitation over 
parts of the north state. Heavier rain and mountain snow will be 
pushing over the north state between Wednesday afternoon and 
Thursday.
This first moderately strong weather system will bring between
three quarters and two inches of rainfall to the valley from mid 
day Wednesday to mid day Thursday. Some foothill locations could 
see 3 inches or more of rainfall. Snow levels will start out 
moderately high at between 5000 and 6000 feet but then lower to 
around 4000 feet by Thursday afternoon. Several inches of snow 
will be possible above 4000 feet with up to a foot and a half possible
higher elevation and two feet or more possible highest peaks. 
In addition to the rain and snow...gusty winds are likely with the
Wednesday/Thursday system. Winds gusts to 40 mph are forecast for
the valley and up to 50 mph over the mountains. White-out 
conditions will be possible at times over the Sierra Cascade 
Range. 
After a break on Thursday afternoon and evening another storm
system will hit northern California on Friday. This system will be
a little weaker than the previous system in precipitation amounts
and wind but will come with lower snow levels generally between 
3000 and 4000 feet. Another Pacific storm is forecast to move 
through around Sunday bringing still more rain, wind and mountain 
snow but with even lower snow levels between 2000 and 3000 feet. 
Travel impacts over the mountains are likely with each of these 
weather systems with chain controls and delays likely. Local 
flooding potential will return as well especially as rainfall 
accumulation totals rise with each storm. Finally...periods of
strong winds may bring downed trees or tree limbs and cause power
outages especially late Wednesday and Sunday. 
Those that may be impacted by this series of storms should 
continue to monitor the latest forecasts. 
        

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Updated Automatically by Ambient Weather's Virtual Weather Station  V15.00